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31.2

On the cover: New Yorker Balaram Stack is well acquainted with tunnels. From the complexities of his hometown’s subway system to the depths of Mainland Mexico tubes, he knows the importance of choosing the right line. Threads inside the issue trace equally varied paths, including digital renderings of natural wave patterns, a window into the halcyon days of Aussie surf media, modern thrashing in Tasmanian waters, and other throughlines across the seascape.

Past Issues

The Surfer’s Journal 31.1

31.1

On the cover: David Nuuhiwa shows the 22nd Street locals some barrel-strength beachboy style. 1964, Hermosa Beach. Photographer LeRoy Grannis’ back-of-print note reveals it was a Friday.

From the symbolic figures to the modern punters, the culture pillars to the remote outposts, the hero shots to the candid representations, TSJ 31.1 offers a perspective found nowhere else in surfing.

TSJ 30.6

30.6

On the cover: Chippa Wilson double mugs it while, in the immortal words of The Beverly Hillbillies’ Jed Clampett, taking a dip in the “cement pond.”

Features inside the book offer cuts that span the gamut in craft, era, place, and perspective: A character study of pro surfing’s biggest cryptic. Two decades worth of under-the-radar lineups from across the globe. Slide slipping the masses in a wave riding boomtown. First-person narratives of big-wave surfing’s heaviest feats. A 1960s epoch-marking cartoonist. The figure behind South Africa’s establishment as a surfing powerhouse in the 70s. Modern captures of Waikiki rollers and Pipe lip throws from a shooter decidedly in the mix. Authentic surf, printed and bound.

The Surfer’s Journal 30.5

30.5

On the cover: Nathan Fletcher takes a no-frills, only-pop-matters approach above the horizon line at Pipeline’s end.

Inside, you’ll explore the surprising wave resources of an overlooked Caribbean island, chase right-hand points up the East Coast of South Africa, and study once-thought-lost photographs of Sydney’s burgeoning 1960s surf scene. Trace the surfing germ of a French playboy and socialite, and be schooled on the contributions of a contemporary big-wave pioneer. And for those seeking wider-breadth of the topic, check the seascape paintings of a nineteenth-century Swede, and hang in the yard with a modern California surf-boat builder. It’s a range found nowhere else in surfing.

The Surfer’s Journal 30.4

30.4

On the cover: Yes, it’s still out there. Kael Walsh finds just what he’s looking for—and finds it all by himself—at quite possibly the most crowded lineup on Earth: the Superbank.

Peel back the lid, and the issue offers full-breadth in the topic. Wider-culture points abound, from an investigation into the seminal artist who first sprayed paint on a surfboard to an overlooked but holding region in Brazil. Tracking the path of a 60s-era luminary and an examination of the title-holder at one of the world’s heaviest waves provide in-depth written portraiture. Where place is concerned, a memoir of an 80s Baja mag trip and a visual study of the seasons and peculiarities of coastal New England set immersive scenes.

30.3

On the cover: Kainehe Hunt finds room to stretch amid the backwash chaos on an otherwise picture-postcard afternoon in Hawaii.

The issue’s inner workings offer a far-and-wide trip in era, avenue, and geography: Smugglers laying down the original tracks at a famed Indonesian reef pass. The Southern California showdown between a sitting US President and a surf culture-maker. A written portrait of one of the world tour’s all-time leading proponents of surf progression. Modern exploration in a harsh, boom-or-bust European sea. High-action photography from one of the world’s most wave-rich regions. 30.3 is fully composed from end to end.

30.2

On the cover: Mid-morning light. A locked inside edge. Body English born of pure reaction. Some frames just embody the whole big thing. Sam Hawk, Off The Wall, 1975.

Page one is backed by a full tracking of the cover subject’s transformation from Huntington surf rat to Pipeline groundbreaker in the 1970s. Spot studies also abound, including the history of big-wave surfing at South Africa's Sunset Reef and the risk versus reward of surf tripping to a Mexican prison island. Find high-art lessons in an excerpt from celebrated author Paul Theroux’s new surf-centric novel and a page-by-page look at photographer Slim Aarons’ ocean-peripheral work. As to contemporary happenings, a visual roundup from a dozen of the game’s best photographers hits on global action points.

30.1

For the first issue in our 30th year of print, we lead off with an image as pure and irreproachable as the pursuit itself.

The inner workings of TSJ 30.1 are framed by culture checks: Tracing the early 1960s surf-exploitation film genre, the underappreciated role sanders play in the surfboard-building process, and the recounting of the fantasy and realities of finding a surfing Eden by the always worth-reading Bryan Di Salvatore. Chart-plot pointbreaks in West Africa, rain-dodge in the Pacific Northwest, and take stock of Portugal’s ascension as a major surf destination. The high-action water photography of Laserwolf and the intimate illustrations of artist AJ Dungo present disparate but equally personal representations of the life.

29.6

On the cover: Tommy Dalton breathes through his nose and keeps his mouth shut in the rural heartland of New Zealand.

TSJ 29.6 nearly breaks the odometer, jumping from an unlikely shaping bay in the Californian desert to trespassing for empty lineups in the Antipodes to checking the reemerging balsa scene among locals in Papua New Guinea. A look back at the surf lineage of a mile-long stretch of San Diego beach and a profile of the multi-craft expert Kai Lenny provide written doses of subcultural tradition and pure evolution. Visually, the issue’s showcases on fine artist Milton Avery’s abstract seascapes and photographer Will Adler’s atmospheric captures serve as reminders that the ocean, and riding waves, ultimately boils down to feeling it. Find all that and more inside.

29.5

On the cover: We’ve explored the tube from every conceivable POV, including the surfer’s. Recent developments in “spherical capture” are rubbing up against virtual reality, as displayed by Jordy Maree in South Africa.

In TSJ 29.5, we pay close inspection to waypoints as far as Namibia’s Skeleton Coast to take stock of that sand-dredging bender, and as wide as the snowsurf movement deep in the mountains of Japan’s Hokkaido Island. Profiles of Waikiki style staple Arthur “Toots” Anchinges and Australian surfer-rocker-taxidermist Jaleesa Vincent provide contemporary written portraiture, while a look at the premillennial photography of charmer Rennie Ellis and a 10-spread roundup of the latest work from the world’s best surf shooters offers page-stopping visual stimuli. All that, and more, between the flaps.

The Surfer’s Journal 29.4

29.4

On the cover: Mikey February reminds us that good style is predicated on not thinking about style. Inside the new issue, we hit check-points from Alaska to the Azores, take a close visual study of Tom Servais’ last decade of high-profile surf shooting, and pay our culture collection fee to the modern skimboard scene. Profiles of surfing satirist Sterling Spencer and shortboard-revolution performance pusher Sharron Weber lend human interest touches, while Nate Tyler’s hand-built home in Central California and surfboards recycled as signage on the North Shore are explorations in atypical craftsmanship.

The Surfer’s Journal 29.3

29.3

Between the flaps, TSJ 29.3 spins its compass from dodging landmines in the Falklands, to an unassisted paddle journey from Alaska to Cabo, and to the river-wave surf scene springing up in Boise, Idaho. Shaper Donald Brink’s experimentations in surfboard sonics and Martin Machado’s oceanic etchings provide doses of written and visual portraiture, while the portfolio of Sarah Lee, Derek Dunfee’s intimate look at the modern big-wave stage, and Brad Barrett’s 1960s retrospective offer photographic page studies.

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