Current Issue:

29.5

On the cover: We’ve explored the tube from every conceivable POV, including the surfer’s. Recent developments in “spherical capture” are rubbing up against virtual reality, as displayed by Jordy Maree in South Africa.

In TSJ 29.5, we pay close inspection to waypoints as far as Namibia’s Skeleton Coast to take stock of that sand-dredging bender, and as wide as the snowsurf movement deep in the mountains of Japan’s Hokkaido Island. Profiles of Waikiki style staple Arthur “Toots” Anchinges and Australian surfer-rocker-taxidermist Jaleesa Vincent provide contemporary written portraiture, while a look at the premillennial photography of charmer Rennie Ellis and a 10-spread roundup of the latest work from the world’s best surf shooters offers page-stopping visual stimuli. All that, and more, between the flaps.

Features
Essay: Pixel by Pixel Illustration by Tyler Comrie

“What we experience as surfing on our screens perpetuates the uncooked idea that amplification is everything. That it actually matters. That we must worship the construct of this new way to watch as offering systemic value to society.”

Page 16

ESSAY: PIXEL BY PIXEL

Photograph by Larry Gehrke

Page 20

SURFING UNTIL 100

An interview with Felipe Pomar.

Photograph by Tommy Pierucki

“As Toots descends he pulls water to match the wave’s speed, then glides for several long beats before hopping to a deep crouch. It sounds idiotic, but his is a real classic sort of crouch. His feet are parallel and pointing forward, arms extended as he prepares to head-dip the first section, everything held just so. Only in surfing can a crouch be so expressive.”

Page 26

BEING TOOTS

The inner world of Arthur Anchinges.

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Photograph Courtesy of GoPro

Page 38

SINGULARITY

Virtual reality is coming to surfing, bringing forward the next tech for the tube.

Photograph by Rennie Ellis

“Rennie was a disorganized ditherer much of the time, but the moment he ventured forth with his Pentax in hand he was like an infantryman with an M4 carbine. Except his mission was more likely to end in tears of laughter than the other kind. He was simply relentless and fearless in pursuit of the shot.”

Page 50

LIFE’S A BEACH

The fine-art, lowbrow photography of Rennie Ellis.

Photograph by Damea Dorsey

Page 64

TINY DEVOTIONS

Moments in the abstract with Krystian Stjerne.

Photograph by Alan Van Gysen

“What you don’t see from the safety of a computer monitor is the frigid Benguela Current seeping through 4mm of rubber, or the grueling mile-and-a-half-long trek back up the point with the wind shrieking against you. It doesn’t show you the carcasses of dead seals strewn in the sand.”

Page 70

THE SANDS OF WALVIS

How a fickle sandbar on the Skeleton Coast became the most captivating wave you’ll never surf.

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Photograph by Woody Gooch

Page 84

AN ASSEMBLAGE OF BONES

Jaleesa Vincent is the future of women’s freesurfing. Just don’t tell her.

Photograph by Kazushige Fujita

“Gerry Lopez refers to Tamai as the Craig Kelly of Japan because of his pioneering backcountry discoveries. And Chris Christenson calls him the Skip Frye of snowboarding because of his timeless, heirloom designs. However you try to define him, Tamai has always taken a different approach to riding a board down the mountain.”

Page 92

THE SNOWSURFER

At home with Taro Tamai.

Photograph by Jeremy Koreski

Page 100

PORTFOLIO: GROUP SHOW

Peak action and offbeat looks from surfing’s top shooters.

Photograph by Jeff Johnson

Page 118

UNDERCURRENTS

Our departments section opens with a workshop study of the Two Crows glassing room at the Waialua Sugar Mill, Oahu, where everything is in its place…but not to such an extent that the inherent art and color of the pursuit are forgotten.

Purist surf energy from Page One to close-of-book. Delivered direct to your door.

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Photograph by Tommy Schultz

When I was going through those years of physical therapy I missed that connection with the ocean. As a SEAL, I grew to love the ocean—I realized surfing could be how I get that back.

Page 120

HUMAN INTEREST: ONE MORE WAVE

How injured Navy SEAL Dan Cnossen reconnected to the ocean.

Photograph by Simon Williams

Page 121

BLANK EXPRESSION: NO LOLLIPOPS

Find Tommy Peterson, and he’ll shape you something legendary.

Photograph by Jeff Divine

Page 122

MISCELLANY

Quick visual hits and written doses ranging from Nikola Tesla’s take on waves, the greatest combination of grace and rage on a surfboard Craig Anderson has ever witnessed, and surf book recommendation sure to join the desert cannon with Thesiger, Lawrence, and de Monfreid. Plus more.

“Since its root periods, we’ve mainstreamed and commoditized surfing’s magic feeling, which has made the whole deal less erotic yet better funded as a categorical choice for human activity. And on and on. The original essence has become yet another rare and trace moment left behind.”

Page 124

SURFING AROUND: CUTTING CLASS

Musing on surfing’s history of romantic rebellion.