Current Issue:

29.2

Inside the book, TSJ 29.2 treks through the Western Australian wilderness looking for empty setups, tests twin-fins at an off-grid Mexican beach break, and recounts some of surfing’s most notorious travel disasters. Essayist Ralph Sneeden’s reflections on bi-coastal identity and shaper-artist Trey Edwards home in Daytona Beach hit on cultural points, while Todd Glaser’s underwater photography and John Respondek’s highlights from six weeks in Indonesia provide visual counterbalance.

Features
Spin The Globe Jimmy WilsonPhoto by Jimmy Wilson

Page 8
SPIN THE GLOBE

Have you traveled this northern shore? Common roadside attractions include wild rice stands, “Smoked Whitefish” signage, and so much deer roadkill that one simply tires of swerving and instead tests the rental car traction control on the still-warm sweetbreads of a two-point yearling.

Essay: Bad Birds. Illustration by Kate CopelandIllustration by Kate Copeland

There are many parallels between the carving that seabirds do through the air and the lines that surfers draw across the water. Seabirds see and read different pockets of wind like we read different waves and different sections of a wave.

Page 12
ESSAY: BAD BIRDS

If aviary flight patterns mirror surf styles, is surfing just an act of nature?

Interview: Jamie Mitchell. Photograph by Timo JarvinenPhoto by Timo Jarvinen

Page 16
INTERVIEW: JAMIE MITCHELL

Reasons to keep paddling.

Todd Glaser’s underwater dreamscapes.Photo by Todd Glaser

Maybe the mammalian dive reflex subconsciously resonates when we see a photograph taken underwater. Maybe that’s why we pause on a barrel shot snapped from the octopus’ garden a little longer than one long-lensed from land.

Page 22
SUBMARINER

Todd Glaser’s underwater dreamscapes.

Boot LeatherPhoto by Nick Colbey

Page 32
BOOT LEATHER

In Western Australia, wilderness is just past the car park.

Back From HellIllustration by Will Sweeny

None of these horror stories have done anything to slow surf tourism in danger zones. You could even argue the opposite is true, that surfers are drawn to the risks. Maybe we like hearing gnarly travel tales because, in the era of luxe surf camps and mechanical wave pools, it reminds us of our collective roots, or surfing before it was pre-chewed and safe.

Page 42
BACK FROM HELL

Unpacking our hard-wired fascination with surf trip disasters.

When Worlds CollidedPhoto by Drew Kampion

Page 48
WHEN WORLDS COLLIDED

The 1970 World Contest wasn’t just a reflection of the sport—it was a mirror of surf culture itself.

South of the SpeedwayPhoto by Matt Titone

Design was privileged over the sacredness of the planer, aesthetics paid less attention to traditions and rather to Edwards’ taste. He drafted up gliders, winged quads, and mini Simmons—things just not found in the surf here.

Page 58
SOUTH OF THE SPEEDWAY

At home with Daytona shaper-artist Trey Edwards.

Twin-Fin MiscellaneaPhoto by Russell Holiday

Page 66
TWIN-FIN MISCELLANEA

An offshore-fanned beachbreak, with a skilled crew in attendance, provides a test track for homegrown designs.

Memory and the First CoastPhoto by Kenny Hurtado

If bodies of water are like wine, this one—the Pacific—has a strange hue, a different nose. Decay comes to mind, fishiness infused with something darker that emanates from a depth more ancient than that to which I’m accustomed.

Page 76
MEMORY AND THE FIRST COAST

Coming to terms with bi-coastal identification.

Some Assembly RequiredPhoto by Morgan Maassen

Page 84
SOME ASSEMBLY REQUIRED

Nole Cossart’s journey into the arduous and the arcane.

The Greener Grasses of IndonesiaPhoto by John Respondek

At night, fireworks explode on the bow and anything not bolted down gets thrown overboard. The charter company sends us a bill when we get back to shore: deck chairs, a vacuum cleaner, and a glass dish set head up a list of items sunk in the Indian Ocean.

Page 96
THE GREENER GRASSES OF INDONESIA

Six weeks spent scouting the archipelago’s outer reaches.

Undercurrents. Photograph by Willy UribePhoto by Willy Uribe

Page 118
UNDERCURRENTS

The issue’s departments section opens with a bird’s eye view of the return of the Basque Country’s finest sand-bottom point.

Field Report: Dung Beach. Photograph by Arthur BelalaPhoto by Arthur Belala

The taste and smell of saltwater has been replaced with oil and mud. My wax turns slick, the liquefies in the heat. But my new board is baptized.

Page 120
FIELD REPORT: DUNG BEACH

Vodka for breakfast. River rat for lunch. Ear infection for dinner. Surfing in Louisiana requires an adjusted diet.

BANZAI PIPELINE, HAWAII - DECEMBER 14: Andy Irons of Hawaii pulls into a barrell in his opening heat of the Xbox Pipeline Masters at the Banzai Pipeline on the North Shore of Oahu, Hawaii on December 14, 2002. The Xbox Pipeline Masters is the final jewel in the Triple Crown of Surfing featuring a trio of world championship surfing events on the North Shore of Hawaii. (Photo by Grant Ellis ostee/Getty Images)Photo by by Pierre Tostee/Getty Images

Page 122
MISCELLANY

Bite-size chunks of written and visual points of interest, finds, and recommendations—ranging from chrome robot surf art to Taj Burrow’s recollection of his favorite and most impactful Andy Irons performance.

Surfing Around: Setting A Natural Course. Photograph by Ben ThouardPhoto by Ben Thouard

Becoming intimate with the wave phenomenon—by repeatedly playing within its sphere of habits and aberrations—creates a relationship with its natural energy. None of this is on a surfer’s mind when in the act but, as the years pass, it can increasingly underlie his or her persona.

Page 124
SURFING AROUND: SETTING A NATURAL COURSE

The values of choosing a life in pursuit of waves.