Your Cart

John Hook

Gallery Viewing:
John Hook

Gallery Viewing:
John Hook

Hawaii-based lensman John Hook is hesitant to call himself a surf photographer. “When it comes down to it,” he says, “surf photography is, like, zero percent of my income. But it’s 100 percent of what I love doing.” 

In this showcase, explore the natural and cultural beauty that, for Hook, continues to thrive on Oahu. Swim out at Pipeline where he meticulously times each frame, preserving the limited amount of exposures when shooting film, working his magic inside the box. Perch on the balconies of Waikiki’s mid-century hotels and snipe glimpses of the enduring beachboy culture and blow-in trappings alike. Watch the Funtographer in action, hear the stories behind some of his favorite photographs, and sink into the night for a quiet slide under Town’s lights.

[Captions by the photographer.]

The Funtographer

A short film focused on the how, where, and why the Hawaiian lensman plies his trade.

The Palms of Queens

Lots of my film photos stem from curiosity, luck, and camera tricks. Using the double exposure effect is one of my favorite ways to spice up a photo—like this one of Arthur “Toots” Anchinges at Queens, layered with palm fronds.

Buy a Print

Splash Zone

The tide pool at Pipe provides an interesting dynamic. There’s 0-year-old kids playing and floating around, while just on the other side of the berm is the deadliest wave in the world.

Buy a Print

Quiet Amplitude

I rarely shoot waves from land, but I really wanted a “corduroy lines” photo. So I hiked into the hills overlooking the North Shore. One outer reef wave feathered among the swells, and click—a lucky shot.

Buy a Print

Last Look in Paradise

I enjoy trying to capture that feeling of Hawaii being the coolest thing you’ve ever seen. I try to see Oahu from the perspective of a tourist who spent all their money to come here.

Buy a Print

12:03 a.m.

Kahana Kalama, sliding one just past midnight. Waikiki’s city lights and hotels give you just enough glow that surfing can be photographed well after the sun sinks into the Pacific.

Buy a Print

“Still, to this day, all I want to do is take pictures of my friends surfing, whether that’s 1-foot Waikiki or giant wherever.”

Country Day, Town Night

This image is the result of shooting underwater on the North Shore in the morning, then reloading that same roll of film to shoot double exposures in Waikiki at night, all within a 24 hour span.

Buy a Print

Queens Ball

Playing tourist in Waikiki is so fun for me. The Aston Waikiki Circle is my favorite hotel to stay at in Town. It has bad fish-themed wallpaper and the best view of Queens you’ll ever see.

Buy a Print

After-Hours Delight at Pipeline

If Pipeline’s on, I’ll go no matter what. I just want to see it. I have to see it. There’s something weird about that place. You just want to be out there looking at it. It’s so strange, that wave’s effect.

Buy a Print

Bring Down the Curtain

Diamonds in the sky and Zeke Lau in the mist. Every Pipeline wave these younger guys are on would be the wave of my life. They always kick-out by me and are just like, “Whatever.” It must be nice.

Buy a Print

About the Photographer

When not in the water, Hook works as a retained senior staff photographer for Nella Media Group and has shot countless covers and articles for FLUX Hawaii magazine, Lei, and others—gorgeous portraits of interesting local people and candid moments of Hawaiian-focused culture. Hook has won awards for his work, but he takes those about as seriously as he does his driver’s license photo.  “I don’t want to be the guy who’s taking it too seriously,” he says. “I want to enjoy this.” For a deeper look at his work, check out Hook’s portfolio from TSJ 30.6 here.

Shop All Prints

Shop All Prints

Mark McInnis

Mark McInnis

Mark McInnis

 

One of the first surf photographers to truly ply his trade in the Pacific Northwest, Mark McInnis won’t even go so far as to call it that. He prefers the Lake-Poets-sounding “Cascadia” instead. 

In this showcase, collected from 20 years of shooting remote plots, cut track with the photographer and plow through dripping ferns and nettle, step onto black-sand beaches redolent of spruce sap and bear sign, check sea stacks and flotsam redwood bisecting wave forms—all captured in pin-sharp compositions. It’s a world most of us will never surf, and that’s a measurable amount of the appeal.

[Captions by the photographer.]

The Easy Goodbye

Anytime someone sees this image, they ask, “How could you drive away from that?” The answer is that it’s tough, but made a little easier after you’ve had it all to yourself—all morning long. To get it, though, you’ve got to put in the work and be comfortable in the cold.

Buy a Print

The Macrocosm of Mark McInnis

A short bio film focused on the how and where the gelid-eyed lensman plies his trade.

Tantalizing Mechanics

Some of the waves in this part of South America are incredibly crowded, and for good reason: the points here are as perfect as anywhere in the world. But known spots are just a few of a lot more. Sniff around a corner or two, and empty setups are plentily on offer.

Buy a Print

Hot Feet

Dane Anderson and I waited a month for this wave to show itself. Well worth the stakeout, even with the air temperature in single digits.

Buy a Print

Lone Pulse

For all the empty lineups, high-performance action, and untrodden landscapes I shoot, this image of an unbroken swell line approaching shore has become one of my all-time favorites.

Buy a Print

Pacific Northwest Glow

Despite how it’s often portrayed, the PNW isn’t all grey skies, fog, and rain. And when the sun does come out, it often reveals perspectives and viewpoints you wouldn’t find anywhere else.

Buy a Print

“As long as I’m searching for waves to photograph, my natural instinct will always be to look for rugged and wide-open places well off the beaten track. My paradise is frigid, empty, and reeling.”

Next Question

Enjoy a short Q&A session with the photographer on his background, method, travels, and more.

Josh Mulcoy, California

Josh has been seeking out and finding unsurfed waves along the west coast of North America for decades, and has been a huge influence on me in where and how I travel. He and I value the same things when it comes to surfing and photographing it: stylish turns and long tubes, ideally found in places other people want nothing to do with—whether that’s far away or close to home in Santa Cruz. He’s a master at pulling it off. I remember this wave distinctly. It’s hard to surf like that in icy water and thick rubber. And just after this wave, my lens quit working. I’m so thankful it didn’t happen any earlier.

Buy a Print

Evening Rays

An oft-overlooked slab in Canada. I can’t stress it enough: If you want to surf good waves with not another soul around, they’re very much out there. Just remember not to be too specific with the coordinates, lest we all lose out.

Buy a Print

The Ice Palace

It’s rare for conditions like these to line up, even in really harsh environments. That makes it extra special when it does. To me, there’s nothing more romantic in surfing than the combination of flawless point waves and snowfall.

Buy a Print

About the Photographer

Hailing from the Pacific Northwest, award-winning photographer Mark McInnis has spent nearly two decades capturing the region’s natural beauty and rugged harshness—and, in particular, its surf resources that exist in between. Well aware that those factors are an increasing scarcity in today’s world, he truly does it right: mostly traveling alone, trekking around each bend by foot, sweeping over his tracks, and keeping mum on the specifics. 

As a product of his environment, he’s cultivated both an eye and a mode that has served him well in a variety of photographic pursuits the world over, whether shooting other remote landscapes and seascapes, performance-oriented punters in warmer locales, or framing lookbooks in commercial endeavors for major brands.

Shop All Prints

Shop All Prints

Become a TSJ Member Today

Support independent surf journalism, receive our storytelling in ink and paper, and gain access to our complete digital archive.

Subscribe